911 CALL FOR WISCONSIN MIDDLE SCHOOL PRINCIPAL ON SUSPICION OF HARMING A SHEEP

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Submitted Date 08/15/2020
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August 14, 2020

Bravitch County Sheriff's Department was alerted by a 911 call to Middle School Principal Greg Hayward's hobby farm outside of rural Milleen this evening.

The caller, also of Mileen, Vicki Halverson, stated in the call that she was walking her retriever, Gus, by Hayward's farm on County Road J just after eight o'clock Thursday evening when she noticed what appeared to be Principal Hayward seemingly slapping and whipping a sheep.

In a statement, Halverson told Deputies on the scene, "I could see him out in the pasture about forty yards away. The abuse was alarming. He seemed to hit the poor sheep, knock it to the ground, pull it back up again, then slap or hit it back down. He had what looked like a small whip." But the abuse didn't stop there. "He was also cussing at the poor thing, calling it filthy names like wh**e and bi**h."

In addition to authorities, Halverson also alerted the Southeastern Wisconsin Humane Society. Verda Dickinson, regional director of SEWHS, arrived with a team shortly after Deputies Marshall and Crichton. "We had a truck and trailer and were ready to take the sheep and any other animals that showed signs of neglect or misuse. We take all calls seriously whether it is a cat or an abused sheep."

But all of this was for naught. Upon investigation, Deputies Marshall and Crichton found that it was not a sheep after all but Hayward's wife, Ginger Hayward, in the pasture with him. According to Deputy Marshall, "It was all a case of mistaken identity. As we entered the property and made our way out to Greg, he cinched his belt buckle and started yelling at the sheep to 'get up, get up!'"

That's when deputies noticed something peculiar. "The sheep stood fully up on its back legs and congenially waved its hooves to us. It was Mrs. Hayward in a sheep's costume."

Both the Haywards were available for a brief comment. Mr. Hayward wanted to make sure that Mileen Public Schools understood that they did not have an animal abuser as a principal. "It was the end of the school year. We had a tough group of eighth-graders who hated distance learning. I wanted to let off a little steam out here before teacher workshop started up again. I understand that the next time that Ginger and I do this sort of thing, we'll do it in the shed or perhaps the barn. But I would never hurt any of my animals, neglect them, nor degrade them in any way. The people of Mileen Public Schools can rest assured of that; the esteem of my animals is of the highest regard."

With no harm done, Mrs. Hayward praised local authorities. "Deputy Crichton issued us a warning and then they left pretty much after that. I only hope that Greg's students and staff still have respect for him, knowing that any allegations of animal abuse or neglect have categorically been put to rest."

"We get these calls once or twice a month in this area," stated Deputy Marshall in his final statement. "Once in a Blue Moon they turn out to be an actual animal abuse case, but most of them are cases of this nature. Just last week we were called to a swine farm outside of Monroe, nearly the same thing. I can count maybe one or two actual animal abuse cases in my eight years of service. The people of Southern Wisconsin treat their farm animals with respect, decency, and dignity. They're good people."


 

I've never told a truth in my life.  And OJ Simpson is a killer.

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